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Horizontal Beaded Netting Diagram Tutorial

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Stitch the First Two Rows of Horizontal Netting
Diagrams of the First Two Rows of Horizontal Netting

Diagrams of the first two rows of horizontal netting, with the thread path shown in red. (Please click on the image for a larger view.)

© Chris Franchetti Michaels

Horizontal beaded netting is a lacy, open stitch that involves picking up sets of beads with each stitch. Each row of horizontal netting is made up of a zig- zagging horizontal line of beads.

Begin a horizontal netting pattern by stringing all of the beads for the first row of beadwork, plus several more beads. Those extra beads enable you to make the turn that begins the second row.

Note: The beads in the first row will be pulled into position when you stitch the second row. This is similar to how you begin peyote stitch by stringing all of the beads for the first two rows. In fact, peyote stitch is really a dense form of horizontal netting.

To begin the second row, you pass back through one of the beads in the first row. This bead serves as a link bead, and you locate it by checking your pattern. You then pick up an odd number of beads (often three or five, depending on the pattern), and pass back through the next link bead. Continue this process until you reach the end of the second row.

In the topmost diagram above, a total of twenty beads have been strung. The second diagram shows the thread passing back through the eighth from last bead, which is a link bead. In the third diagram, three beads are picked up, three beads in the first row are skipped over, and the thread passes back through another link bead.

The bottom diagram shows the first and second rows completed and the thread positioned near the end of the second row. This row actually ends when you pick up another set of beads to make the turn that begins the third row. (See the next page.)

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